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Monday, February 02, 2009

Development Name, Delivery Date Announced

A few weeks ago, I snapped this photo of an ongoing renovation in the 1300 block of 9th Street:On Saturday I noticed that a banner has been hung announcing the name of the project, "The Nine," and a website for the same http://theninedc.com/. The renovation of the historic building fronting both 9th Street and Naylor Court should deliver this summer. The mixed use project includes a ground floor commercial space and several residences. The residences are advertised as being "nestled around an intimate courtyard and access to one of Washington's only remaining historic block-wide alleys." Here is a rendering of what the completed development will look like:It is thrilling to see this recently-vacant building brought back to life. The addition of another new commercial space and additional new residences to this block will really add to the vibrancy of the block (which is already pretty vibrant, with such notable neighbors as Be Bar, Azi's Cafe, The Long View Gallery, and Maruka School of Yoga and Boutique, and the upcoming tenants of The Exchange). Any thoughts on what kind of retail would be desirable for this building?

9 comments:

si said...

julia's empanadas dangit.

Mr. Q said...

A comfortable place with good food and you don't have to spend a fortune please...is that too much to ask??? A place like Vynl in NYC (9th Ave and 51st St) would be good...www.vynl-nyc.com if anyone cares...

ML said...

Bodo's Bagels.

Anonymous said...

hip bookstore/record store. OK if just a bookstore

Anonymous said...

While development of this property is valuable, if one looks at the project from the alley side you will see that the massing and context is truly out of proportion for an historic collection of little stables. This is the largest intact collection in the city - 15 remaining. The stable and the home that were torn down dated from 1863 and 1868 respectively and had been protected by their status on the National Register of Landmark Historic Properties. Development in this area is exciting, but it must be done with sensitivity to historical context.

Anonymous said...

As a neighbor who directly faces Naylor Court, I am not at all thrilled with the Ninth Street/Naylor Court development. A tall, inappropriate building in the Alley replaces a small solidly built stable that should have been restored. Look at Naylor court from O Street and see how unattractive and inappropriate this building looks. Second, most immediate neighbors don't need or want another bar or club. These businesses only add "vibrancy" at night and that "vibrancy" sometimes leads to crime. We really need daytime vibrancy similar to that inspired by Azi's; we need a bookstore/card shop, a pharmacy, or a post office. The city has allowed the architectural integrity of Naylor Court to be destroyed by allowing a contractor to overbuild on a small city lot. And we neighbors will not even benefit from the retailers who come here.

jescowa said...

Geez, Anonymous, can you spell N.I.M.B.Y.? Hypercommitment to historic preservation is half the reason this neighborhood has lagged so far behind for so long. Who's going to invest in developing a one-story former stable? I guess some people just prefer a boarded-up vacant shell as long as it's historically appropriate.

Anonymous said...

Having moved to Shaw, I am truly impressed that many of the abandoned structures were not demolished. I love the character and architecture along with the beautiful copper that they have placed on the buildings for the restoration. I would love to see a nice, affordable restaurant or bookstore with desserts (like I need them). As to total restorations, one has to be sensitive when restoring but also practical. At one time most properties had outhouses and yet we don't want those restored....

Scott said...

I'm excited to see the development activity. It's sad to see that once again, overly sensitive critics are voicing the opinions on the historical asthetics. We should be happy that we are getting one more vacant property developed and nicely compared to other projects I've seen. Now, let's not jeopardize a retail opportunity either. Please don't try to squash a nice restaurant or bar from coming to our neighborhood. Let's be realistic about this. A "nice card store or a bookstore"?? These types of stores have a tough time keeping open even in bustling neighborhoods in NY or San Fran. If we make it difficult on a bar or restaurant to open in our neighborhood we will end up with nothing but vacant, undeveloped properties. What would you rather have??